10 Most Important Events In U.S. History (So Far)

10 Most Important Events In U.S. History (So Far)
10 Most Important Events In U.S. History (So Far)

10 Most Important Events In U.S. History (So Far)

 

Throughout the history of the United States, there have been several events which have not only changed the course of our country, it actually changed the lives of those were were alive during the event.

 

Trying to narrow down the top 10 most important events in U.S. history is difficult, as many have occurred in the 240 years since the country has been founded. From land expansion that gave the country new territory and monuments that were erected with pride, to great wars and devastating terrorist events, the history of the U.S. is filled with both good and bad events, yet each and every one still impacts those of us who live here today.

 

These events were those that brought the nation together, and in some cases, ripped people apart. They created buzz across the land when they occurred, and when the technology was great enough, had families, and in some cases entire towns, gathered around their television sets and radios.

 

Though some of these events happened decades before we were born, that doesn’t mean that they cannot still impact us today, and the United States that we live in now, was shaped by these events. In other words, without the tragedy, wars, leadership and patriotism, the United States that we know today would have failed to exist. So, what are the top 10 most important events in U.S. history so far? Read on to find out:

 

10. The Founding of Jamestown

 

Jamestown really got the party started.
Jamestown really got the party started.

Though most people attribute the Pilgrims as the first people to start a colony in the United States, this isn’t true. There were actually a number of colonies that were founded before the Pilgrims ever arrived to Plymouth Rock, including the colony of Jamestown, VA.

 

The colony of Jamestown is important because it is considered the first permanent English settlement in the New World, and it is tied with stories such as the tale of Pocahontas, which isn’t as nice as Disney would have you believe.  Additionally, the colony of Jamestown was the first colony to bring Africans over, and the people treated them as indentured servants, not yet slaves. The language, custom, government and beliefs of these founders are quite similar to those we have today.

 

The colony was chartered in 1606, a full 13 years before the Pilgrims came over, and it was named for King James I from England. John Smith was the governor of the colony in 1608, and he established a “no work, no food” policy, which started a string of issues in the colony. The following years were filled with starvation, fires, wars and the death of many of the settlers.

 

The first Africans, kidnapped from Angola, were brought to Jamestown in 1619, and these practices were what would eventually lead to the rise of slavery. Though there were a number of bad things about Jamestown, there is still a residence in the colony today, and the practices and culture of the settlement spread throughout the rest of the 13 colonies, and ultimately serve as the bases of our modern practices and culture.

 

9. The American Revolution

 

The American Revolution. We hated taxes from the jump.
The American Revolution. We hated taxes from the jump.

If you look ahead about 170 years from the founding of Jamestown, you will see the beginnings of the American Revolution. This is the point where the US ceased simply being a colony of Britain, and instead became the United States of America.

 

Technically, the American Revolutions lasted from April 1776 to October of 1781, but we celebrate our nations birthday on July 4th, as this is the date in 1776 that the Declaration of Independence was ratified and shared throughout the colonies, which were now going to be states.

 

Of course, Great Britain wasn’t going to just take this lying down, as they had a lot of income which was coming in from these colonies, and now, these men were seen as traitors to the crown. If it wasn’t for the leadership of General George Washington and a great deal of help from the French, the Declaration of Independence probably wouldn’t have meant a lot.

 

Fortunately, in the five years of war with Great Britain following the signing of the document, the American and French forces were able to slowly, but surely beat down the Red Coats. It wasn’t easy, however, and General Washington actually lost six major battles to the British, and all seemed to be lost. However, he was able to lead his troops to victory against his main antagonist, Charles Lord Cornwallis, who eventually surrendered after losing to Washington and the French military leader, Gilbert du Motier, who was the Marquis de Lafayette, in the Battle of Yorktown.

 

8. The Louisiana Purchase

 

The Louisiana Purchase talk about a real estate deal.
The Louisiana Purchase talk about a real estate deal.

Though the land that we know of today as part of the United States was always there, it didn’t always belong to the United States. Up until the early 1800s, the United States only consisted of the 13 original colonies, which were now states, as well as Vermont, Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio. In addition, there was a large tract of land known as the Indiana Territory, which covered some of the areas of modern day Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. There was also a small area of land known as the Mississippi Territory. The rest of the land that we know of as the United States was owned by either Spain or France.

 

France owned the Louisiana Territory, which was approximately 828,800 square miles of land that covered more than 15 modern states including Kansas, Iowa, Oklahoma and Missouri, to name a few. France has a lot of debt to the U.S. at the time, so Thomas Jefferson, who was the President at the time, made a deal with France to buy the land. He spent only about $15 million on the purchase, and canceled France’s debt. In the process, when making the Louisiana Purchase, he doubled the land area of the United States.

 

It is said that Napoleon Bonaparte, who was the leader of France at the time, only agreed to the sale of the land to stick it to England, who was a huge rival of the French. Napoleon was counting on the US conquering the British on the water, and this was his way of picking sides.

 

7. The Assassination of President Abraham Lincoln

 

President Abraham Lincoln.
President Abraham Lincoln.

In 1865, the United States was reeling. Stuck in a massive Civil War between the north and south, long gone were the days of the Revolution when all citizens were united in a common goal. President Abraham Lincoln was elected in 1860, and the Civil War began just a few months later, so for much of his term, he was a war-time President…the only one to ever lead the country while war was occurring on American soil.

 

The four years of the Civil War were some of the worst in the history of the country of all time, but President Lincoln was able to bring it all together, and the south eventually conceded to the north. Though the war was as good as over at this time, there were a number of people who were angry with the outcome, including an actor from Maryland named John Wilkes Booth.

 

Booth and his cronies because upset with how Lincoln was handling the war, and hatched a plan to kidnap him, and then take him to the Confederate capital, which was in Richmond. However, Lincoln failed to appear, and two weeks later, Richmond fell to the Union. This angered Booth even more, and desperate to save the Confederacy and throw the government into array, Booth planned on killing Lincoln, his Vice President Andrew Johnson, and the Secretary of State, William H. Seward. He succeeded in shooting Lincoln on April 14, 1865 during a performance at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. This was a turning point in American history, and one that we still deal with, in some sense, today, due to the racial segregation that is still present in our culture.

 

6. World War II

 

World War II. When madness scarred the world.
World War II. When madness scarred the world.

If there is one event in the history of the world that affected each and every person in the country, and for much of the world, for that matter, it was the second World War. This was a war that had nothing good come out of it, short of the suicide of Adolph Hitler, and though the war did not occur on the continental United States, the U.S. was not forced to enter into the war until the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

 

Once the U.S. entered the war, nothing would ever be the same again, for good or for bad. Approximately 60 million people were killed worldwide, and almost 500,000 Americans were killed during the war. At home in the United States, approximately 16 million troops were sent to fight, which affected almost each and every family in the country. Though the US only fought for about four years, those four years were a game changer for the country, and the impact of the war is still felt today.

 

When the troops returned to the U.S. following the war, life was very different. The U.S. economy was actually stimulated by the war, since there was no destruction in the country, and the United States was boosted up to dominate the world economy. Additionally, the U.S. was seen as a major military power in the world, and the country’s position as a world leader was now set.